Mini Monets and Mommies: Alien Slime

Monday, May 25, 2015

Alien Slime

It’s alien slime time! My first foray into the kids' activity of slime-making went so well, that we kept on making the ooey, gooey stuff. I love this artsy science activity, and have no idea why I’ve never tried it before. Even though my son is well past those ‘little kid’ years, he still was completely happy to help out and make the slime – and of course, play with it later on.

Kids' activity

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My first batch was a glitter version. The second one- well, it didn’t go quite as well. I was kind of pleasantly shocked at how perfect the first batch turned out. It was the exact right consistency. Yay! The second one, not so much. I may have accidentally added a bit too much water. Instead of the rubbery consistency that makes this kids' activity, it was clumpy and super-slimy. So, I added in a bit more glue and liquid starch (the universal main components of slime), and it turned into this alien concoction!

Here’s What You’ll Need:

(I scoured the Internet for the best kids slime recipes. I found that a good 95 percent were school glue, water and liquid starch. The other ones subbed Borax or Metamucil  for the liquid starch. Not being a laundry maven, I had never used liquid starch. I found it at (and only at) Wal-Mart. Even though it’s basically corn starch, water, detergents, oils and a few chemicals I didn’t recognize – it’s not non-toxic and it is NO way edible. If you have a child who eats or tastes everything, don’t make this just yet).

·        School glue

·        Tap water

·        Liquid starch

·        Green food coloring

Here’s What to Do:

1.     Measure equal parts of water and glue. I used ½ cup of each. This was roughly half the bottle of glue, so it worked out well.
 
Measuring activity



2.     Mix the water and glue together.

3.     Add the mix to the same measurement (in this case, ½ cup) of liquid starch. Mix it all up. If there’s more water, it will get runnier. Let your child experiment a little with the measurements to get a slimy consistency that he likes.
 
Kids' science

4.     Add a drop or two of food coloring. Mix it all up. Ewwwwww!!!
 
Green goo


If you save the slime in a plastic ware container it should get firmer. I had wanted to make a glow in the dark alien slime, but it never goes so well when I try to make ‘glowing’ projects. My first thought was to swap the tap water for tonic water (it glows under a black light, and I've used it before in other kids' activities), but I’m not certain that there will be enough of the water in it to really give it a good glow. I’m thinking that glowing paint is the way to go. This also typically requires a black light. Maybe next time we’ll experiment with adding glow-in-the-dark craft paint to the mix and show you how it goes!

Sensory play
 
Are you looking for more slime-type ideas? Follow my Pinterest board for slimes, doughs and goos.
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1 comment:

  1. This is a great idea! I am featuring this on my Space Birthday Party Roundup if you don't mind.

    ReplyDelete