Mini Monets and Mommies: Sunny Kids' Art: Mock Stained Glass

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Sunny Kids' Art: Mock Stained Glass


So, working with lead and real glass won’t cut it when it comes to crafting safety with your young child. That said, your young artist can still make a “stained glass” masterpiece of her own. There are two ways that I like to create this faux stained glass project: 1. Using clear acetate (or another clear sheet) and markers, and 2. Using plexi-glass, markers and paints. For simplicity’s sake, this time I’m going to describe how to make the acetate and markers version. Please check back in the (hopefully) near future to see how to do the more complex plexi version.




What You’ll Need

·         Clear acetate sheets- I recommend getting several (or an entire box), as the first attempt may be more of a practice round for your child. If you don’t want to splurge on the acetate, you can do what I did – use a clear, flexible plastic photo or file holder (the kind that went into your high school binder).

·         Markers- I know, no one wants to use permanent markers with little kids. After all, who really wants a Sharpie line drawn down the center of your kitchen table forever? But, as you will see, the acetate’s slick surface and washable markers don’t mix. You’re likely to get a smeary mess (but, that can be fun too!).

·         Poster board or card stock

·         Scissors

·         Clear tape

·         Clear drying school glue

What You’ll Need To Do:

1.      Choose a subject. Make it simple. Your child should be able to draw it only using outlines.

2.      If you’re using a photo/file holder (like I did), cut it in half on the fold.

3.      Have your child draw the outline of her design onto the clear plastic sheet with a black permanent marker.

4.      Using bright or bold colors, your child can fill in her design.

5.      Press another piece of acetate (or the other half of the file holder) on top of the drawing. This will protect it and help to keep the marker from smearing on the window.

6.      Tape the edges of the plastic together.

7.      Make a frame. Although I do believe that the kiddos should do all of their artwork themselves, they may need some help with this step. Place the faux stained glass art onto a poster-sized piece of card stock or poster board (makes sense if you’re going for poster-sized). Cut the board so that you have at least a two inch border on the bottom and sides. The top should be long enough to fold all of the way over the artwork and go to the bottom (it should look like a tent).

8.      Fold the poster board in half.


9.      Draw a window that is slightly smaller than the acetate/plastic stained glass art onto the front of the poster board tent. Cut this out (you will need to help your child do this step, as it involves poking the scissors through the board).

10.  Trace the window onto the other side of the poster board tent and cut it out.

11.  Place the “stained glass” into the middle of the frame, taping it in place.

12.  Tape or glue the frame together and display it on a window.


Your child can add on to this project by decorating the frame with markers, crayons, stickers, paints or anything else that she can think up. When you display the artwork on your window, be careful not to do anything that will destroy the glass. I used tape to hang this one up, but that may leave behind a sticky residue. You can also prop it up against the window sill.

 


2 comments:

  1. this is such a cute idea! i've got to try this with my little ones!

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  2. I had chosen the chicken schnitzel with blue cheese fondue, and the chicken had a lovely crisp coating, was juicy inside and went really well with the oozy, tangy blue cheese sauce. This such a strange choice for me to order in a restaurant but I didn't really fancy red meat or fish that night. http://www.jx-plastic.com/corrugated-roll/

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